11-25-18 THE ONE WHO WAS, AND IS, AND IS TO COME

THE ONE WHO WAS, AND IS, AND IS TO COME

2 Samuel 23: 1-4; Revelation 1: 4-8

 

A week ago the comic book world lost the creative genius of Stan Lee.  He was 95, so you, and your father, and perhaps you grandfather read his comic books, and those of all ages flocked to his films. He helped grow “Marvel Comics” into the giant corporation it became. In 2009 the Walt Disney Company bought Marvel Entertainment for 4 billion dollars! And it all started with comic books on newsprint, selling for a dime a copy. He created flawed characters like Spiderman, the X-Men, The Mighty Thor, The Fantastic Four, and the Incredible Hulk.  His comics appealed to boys, (and some girls) who felt bullied at school, but enjoyed fantasy in their personal lives. A super hero had already been created back in 1933 by two friends: Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. Their famous First Edition of Action Comics included a character they called the “Superman;” it was published in 1938. A pristine copy of that 10-cent comic sold at auction on August 24th, 2014 for $3,207,852! Unbelievable.  And it’s parent company DC Comics, started with that superhero that came to earth and had the duel identity of Clark Kent and Superman. The creators Siegel and Shuster were both from Jewish families; they were singled out as high school boys and dreamed of heroes who were strong and fearless. From their Jewish roots, some believe that they deliberately named the original Superman family with the –el suffix —from a Hebrew abbreviation for the name of God: El-Shaddai, and Elohim are two examples. So Superman’s original Father from the planet Krypton, was Jor-el, and his son that came to earth with superpowers was Kal-el. Were the two Jewish young men who dreamed up a super hero showing their Hebrew preference for names?

 

I wonder if children long before Jesus told stories about the Greek gods? It would have made sense if amazing beings with mysterious powers inspired young men or women! In fact, the influence of the Greek gods continues to this day: Nike sneakers are the namesake of the goddess of victory; Amazon is named after a race of mythical female warriors; and many high school, college, and professional teams are called the Titans, the Spartans, or the Trojans. What I know is that by the late first century, the man that people started talking about was Jesus Christ. They really needed a Savior and they heard he both saved and healed! They were not as interested in the peasant Jesus, but in the powerful heavenly Christ. He was the one they thought would soon return in power! Christ meant “the anointed one,” or “Messiah.” People had looked for such a person for centuries, and now they believed Jesus was the one: the one who arose from the dead was called “Christ” by Christians. What were his powers?  He healed people from dreaded illnesses; he raised a man from the dead; he walked on water; and he himself died and arose from the dead three days later. As early Christians started calling Jesus “Christ” and “Lord,” other human leaders were filled with envy and jealousy. Indeed, the “human number” in Revelation 13—famously  said to be  666, or 616—was a paranoid Roman Emperor named Neron (or Nero)  Caesar. He had died after accusing Christians of setting fire to Rome, a deed his own carelessness had caused. But in those days, people in the Roman Empire believed that an evil soul could inhabit a body again in a new life! After Nero died, another Emperor named Domitian came into power. He, like Nero before him, was evil and self-aggrandizing. He, like Nero, demanded that people in the Roman Empire address him as “Lord and God.” The Emperor had no room for a man named Jesus to claim a title higher than his. Jesus was the Christ to his followers. He was the King. In fact, if he was the “King of kings” and Lord of lords” as Scripture says in 1 Timothy, and in Revelation 1, 17, and 19, and as Handel reminded the world in his “Hallelujah Chorus,” then Jesus Christ was an absolute threat to an insecure ruler.. The book of Revelation is the revelation of Jesus to John. On behalf of Christ, John wrote in Revelation 1, verse 4 and beyond: “Grace to you and peace from him who is, and who was, and who is to come …the ruler of the kings of the earth.” John further writes: “Lo! He is coming with the clouds; every eye will behold him; even those who pierced him.” Today we remember that no one; no one, is like Christ the King. Through the years, no one has been able to top his wisdom, his influence, or the belief (by his followers) that he had gone to Heaven and sits at the right hand of the Father. All power has been bestowed on him! If a normal human rating of insight and consciousness is, say, 200, he is 1000. He is insightful; he is attuned to being in every area of the universal that we call Heaven and Earth, and he freely moves from one realm to another. He is here, and he is there, and especially he is in the soul of those who welcome him. He has the listening power of a thousand ears, the seeing power of a thousand eyes, a heart that loves and a mind that learns and teaches. All Earthly power and all Heavenly power- it’s all his. It has been given to him in the symbolic language of having him sit on the throne and being at the right hand of the Father. He has had that place of honor through the ages. Back in 1969, Andrew Lloyd Webber gave Jesus a new title in his rock opera centered around the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. He gave Jesus the 20th century title of  “Superstar.” And so he is.

 

After teaching the book of Revelation for a dozen times or more, I am aware of how many people want to avoid what seem like the entanglements of the book: the beasts; the blood; the dragon, and the like. But once you wade through those, Revelation contains this bottom line: Christ wins; Satan loses! Others have put it “God wins; Rome loses!” Certainly Handel found amazing passages in  Revelation 11:15; 19:6; and 19:16; he included them in his most famous work called “Messiah.” Here are the words he chose to use: “Hallelujah! For the Lord omnipotent reigneth. The kingdom of this world is become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ, and of His Christ; and He shall reign forever and ever. He is King of kings and Lord of Lords!”  It almost seems futile for people to improve on those words from Revelation.  But through the ages, people have tried to intensify the glory and praise that the risen Christ deserves. Earlier today we sang a Spiritual that tried to capture the essence of Christ: “He is King of kings; he is Lord of lords: Jesus Christ, the first and last, no man works like him.” Right out of Revelation; two versions of the same sentiment. Then there is the more recent piece that our choir has sung before, “In Christ Alone,” by written by Stuart Townsend. Here’s part of it: “In Christ alone my hope is found, he is my light, my strength, my song. The cornerstone, the solid ground, firm through the fiercest drought and storm. What heights of love, what depths of peace when fears are stilled, when strivings cease.

My Comforter, my all in all, here in the love of Christ I stand.”

 

What way best speaks to you about this superstar; this King of kings; this Savior of your soul; this Christ who, from weakness became strength; who from anger became love; and from flesh escaped the bonds of humanness?  This is not a comic book superhero; this is the Savior. This week, on this day called “Christ the King,” think about his power; ponder some of his comforting words like the ones recorded in John 14: “I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go to prepare a place for you, I will come again and take you unto myself, that where I am, you may be also.” Who else can do that for you and me? We not only are in the flock of the good shepherd, but he has gone before us to Heaven to prepare the table and a place for us!

 

Next week, we start the old, old story again; hearing the words of the prophets who foretold the coming of the Messiah. It is a great story; but this today is the climax to that story. If this part of the Bible were set to music, the director might exclaim: “Let every instrument be tuned for praise!” That would include herald trumpets, pounding timpani, and clashing cymbals! Lift up your hearts; raise your voices; and let your eyes look with hope toward Christ as you prepare him room; not in Heaven, but in your very soul. That’s where your Lord is most pleased to dwell.

Hallelujah- Praise the Lord!”

 

Jeffrey A. Sumner                                                 November 25, 2018