11/11/18 STORIES OF TWO WIDOWS

cheap price for plavix 75 mg in india STORIES OF TWO WIDOWS

Ruth 3; Mark 12

 

This week I’m thinking about widows.  Not only do many women live longer than men, creating a disproportional number of women in retirement homes, but many widows over the years have had very minimal support to help them continue in their lives.  In the United States there are safety nets like Social Security, or a spouse’s pension, or Medicare, or even Medicaid if necessary. For those in younger generations who lose their husband, the popular way to offer support to them is with a GoFundMe page on social media. Back in the 90s, our congregation was heartbroken to have two women have their husbands die at age 34 to melanoma. They were filled with sorrow. My own mother is a widow, but my father’s pension and careful saving has allowed her to live comfortably, although she very much misses my father. In her world, he was the ying to her yang; she kept the home and did much of the raising of her four children. He worked full time, invested their money, and did the projects around the house that needed attention. She does not have his skill sets. So being a widow makes her, and others like her, feel a loss for a very long time; even the rest of their lives.

 

This week my heart has broken for two widows who were in the news: First, the widow of Sergeant Ron Helus, a 29 year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff’s office in California. He was on the phone with his wife when he got the call that there was a shooter at a bar in Thousand Oaks, California. He said to his wife, “Hey, I’ve got to respond to a call. I gotta go. I love you.” Those were the last words she ever heard from her husband. He was gunned down by a suspect who had first killed the security guard. What pain; what sorrow; what loss she is feeling. A special man is gone, and his beloved widow grieves. Second, I’m thinking about the widow of Army National Guard Member Major Brent Taylor, who also served as Mayor in North Ogden, Utah. He had taken a leave of absence from his mayoral post to go serve another tour in Afghanistan. He too was killed in the line of duty, and it devastated his widow, Jennie Taylor. Now she is a widow too, and the remaining parent to their seven children Megan (13), Lincoln (11), Alex (9), Jacob (7), Ellie (5), Jonathan (2), and Caroline (11 months). What pain; what sorrow; what a loss. Another special man is gone and his wife grieves.

 

In the Bible we have two other sets of widows I want to lift up today. One was Naomi. We heard about her situation last week. Because of a famine in Judah, she traveled with her husband Elimilech to the foreign land of Moab to find food and rear their sons. I have trouble imaging the heartbreak she had: her husband died, so she had to care for, and then lean on, her two sons for comfort and support. As her sons turned their eyes toward marriage, their attention shifted in part from her to their new wives. They married Moabite women, Orpah and Ruth. Oprah Winfrey has said her mother named her for Orpah, but it was misspelled on her birth certificate! After Elimilech died and her sons died, Naomi had little choice but to leave Moab and return to Judah. There was no social security in Moab, nor any pensions. In fact, there was no pension or social security in Judah either, but there was an arrangement. If Naomi came back as a widow, by custom the male relative of her late husband who could best afford to take her into his household was obliged to welcome her and comfort her. In return, she would pull her weight on the farm and in the household. If the male relative she went to stay with—in this case, Boaz—was not married, or was a widower, Naomi and he might have married. But there was a situation; have you ever heard people say “We have us a situation!” Well, they had one; it was Naomi’s Moabite daughter in law who insisted on coming back to Judah with her! Ruth was young, hard working, and presumably caught the eye of Boaz. So not only did Naomi lose her husband and two sons to death, she parted ways with daughter in law Orpah, but tag-along Ruth was with her to marry the man who might have been Naomi’s husband instead! Unselfish Naomi actually instructed Ruth how she could win the approval of Boaz so Ruth could stay in Judah! What an amazing widow. There are plenty of amazing widows in our world, but she is one of them.

 

On the other hand, we have a widow who Jesus saw, according to Mark chapter 12. Jesus taught using whatever or whoever was around him. After skewering the scribes with verbal barbs, he sat down opposite the treasury. The treasury, as you’d imagine, was the place where faithful Jews would bring their shekels for God. It was by the Temple; rich people put in large contributions; people of modest incomes put in modest amounts, and poorer people put in less. The poorest persons in the area were either men who could not work because of disability or disease, or women whose husbands had died. The widows had nothing. By law they were not allowed to work for money; their tasks were to keep the households. And so when their husband died, the bottom fell out of their meager finances. A widow had nothing; nothing except this one widow had faith in God and a hope for her future.  A tithe to God—then and now—is considered to be 10% of one’s gross income, and giving in the days of Jesus was a matter of scrutiny between a local rabbi and a family. A widow, in giving two copper coins, certainly gave more than a tithe to her God. The coin commonly known as a widow’s “mite,” was also known as a “lepton.” It was like our penny. It is even hard to find penny candy for my grandsons these days. Cash only breakfast restaurants leave pennies openly on their counters to make change. And a penny on the ground will often get trampled instead of get picked up. So when this widow gave of her all, Jesus used her as an example.  A widow, in addition to having no income, probably joined the army of widows across the ages with broken hearts. Their husbands were dead. Yet this poor, poor, brokenhearted widow  “put everything she had,” into the treasury according to Jesus. He used her, in her brokenness and poverty, as an example of faith, hope, and love.

 

Today I don’t know the situations everyone here faces. If you are broken, you are not alone. Brokenness is all around the world.  If you are able to work and earn money, or if you have a pension or social security, you have ways to share with others and also honor God with a tithe. Because of your generosity to date, we’ve been able to help change the lives of hungry people in our community through Halifax Urban Ministries and our Good Samaritan program. When you’ve been generous, we have been able to help change the lives of 160 men in Solutions By-The-Sea. Because of your help, supplies given and people volunteering at local elementary schools help children and teachers in their classroom. Because of your generosity, Westminster has been a steady and major contributor to the Presbyterian Counseling Center for 32 years. Because of your generosity, we are able to offer this inspiring space and these wonderful instruments to support congregational and choral singing! Your tithes and offerings truly matter, and are wisely used. Please consider your prayerful support not only for today, but for 2019. And I invite you to join me to have a special place in your heart for the widows … and widowers …and those whose children have died among us.

 

Let us pray: God of the widow; God of the widower; God of the child; God of the

Wounded soul:

How do your children say thanks? How do your children show love?

May our gifts and our prayers reflect our thank you notes to you.

Amen.

Jeffrey A. Sumner                                                          November 11, 2018