11-04-18 LOVE GOD; LOVE NEIGHBORS

LOVE GOD; LOVE NEIGHBORS

Ruth 1: 1-18; Mark 12; 28-34

 

Sometimes the Bible offers a laser-beam commentary on situations we face in life. This week is such a time.  First, Fred McFeely Rogers was born in 1928 in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, the hometown of Arnold Palmer. He grew up with a love for others, and a love for God.  One passage that he certainly embodied was Jesus’ commandment to “Love the Lord your God with all your heart with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength. And love your neighbor as yourself.” Fred Rogers moved from Pennsylvania to Winter Park, Florida to Major in Music Composition at Rollins College. Afterward he attended and graduated from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary with a Master of Divinity degree. He was, in fact, The Rev. Fred Rogers, a Presbyterian minister, but he was known throughout the world as Mr. Rogers. He created a neighborhood in the studio of the Public Broadcasting Station in Pittsburgh. Throughout the life of the show he created, he decided on the themes, wrote the music, and voiced the puppets as he spoke directly into the camera to children and the parents or grandparents who may have watched too.  Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood was his ministry from 1968 until 2001; and to this day his family and his Foundation have carried on his themes with Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood.

But away from TV, Mr. Rogers’ actual neighborhood was the area around Squirrel Hill in Pittsburgh where, on October 27th, Satan entered a man, urged on by his henchmen on a website of hate, and he killed 11 neighbors who were worshipping God. The henchmen across the globe cheered. But Mr. Rogers had heard the teachings of Jesus and had exemplified them to others in his own unique way. Mr. Rogers modeled what it meant to be a neighbor- welcoming people of color, people with disabilities, people of different faiths, and people from different walks of life: and he called everyone of them “neighbor.” He planted good seeds in his neighborhood of Squirrel Hill. How do I know? Jesus said you can always tell that a good seed has been planted by the fruit that is produces.  When The Tree of Life Synagogue went through unspeakable tragedy last week, the Presbyterians did not say, Oh, you are Jews; Jews should help you.” They said, “You are our neighbors. You may use our building; our people are at your service; we will pray for you and be with you; and we are broken with you.” Jesus would have been pleased. The Muslim congregation in Squirrel Hill did not say, “You are Jews; Jews should help you.” The Imam said: “We are your neighbors and we mourn for you and with you. Do you need money? We will raise it. Do you need comfort? We will offer it. Whatever you need, just ask.” Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood knew how to be neighbors so well in the midst of evil. Even now, they are doing Kingdom work, and Jesus would be pleased.  How do I know? In the gospels, Jesus showed who his neighbors were with his encounters and some of his parables. When he told the story of the good Samaritan, recorded in Luke chapter 10, the Jews must have flinched. (Remember, there were no Christians until after Jesus’ resurrection at the end of the Gospels.) So Jews flinched because there was no such thing as a good Samaritan. They believed they were bad; ungodly, and should be shunned.  Jesus told the story in their face to change the narrative. Jesus was demonstrating who our neighbors are. Another time Jesus crossed into Samaria deliberately (a line as uncrossable as the one between Palestinians and Israelis today) Yet he went there and spoke to a woman at a well; she was convinced Jesus was a prophet and became one of his first evangelists in her land. Jesus was being a neighbor. He was a neighbor even to a Syrophoenican woman who was said to worship different gods.  Other Jews would have shunned her. But she engaged Jesus in a conversation and begged him to heal her daughter from a demon. Jesus heard her out, and inspired by her faith, healed her daughter. Jesus was being a neighbor. Fred Rogers learned how to be a neighbor from his Savior Jesus.  Go and do likewise, as those in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood are doing.

 

Second, our country is in a heated debate regarding immigration, and issues regarding purity of race. Oh if people really read and understood their Bibles. Take, for example, the book of Ruth which I will mention briefly today and say more about next week. Because of a famine in Judah, a Jewish couple—Elimilech and Naomi, and their young sons Mahlon and Chilion—crossed the border into the country of Moab, which today is in Jordan. In our day, crossing a border like that takes a passport and several hours of inspections. But it was not impossible to cross a border during a famine in the days of Ruth. Thank God. The family took up residence in Moab, even though Moabites didn’t worship our God; desperate times call for desperate measures, then and now. Elimilech was the husband, and Naomi was his wife. They were from Bethlehem. Their sons from Judah were Mahlon and Chilion. The sons ending up finding and marrying Moabite women named Orpah, and Ruth. The Judeans grew up in Moab away from their native country because of a famine. In due time Elimilech—the he father—died, leaving Naomi as a widowed Judean in a foreign land. Within 10 years Mahlon and Chilion also died, leaving Naomi, a Judean, in a foreign land with her two Moabite daughters-in-law. Naomi decided to return to Judah where family members would take her in. Orpah agreed to stay behind in the country of her origin and where her people were, but Ruth wanted to go with Naomi, as she said in the famous line in the King James Bible: “Entreat me not to leave me or to keep me from following after thee. For whither thou goest, I will go; where though lodgest, I will lodge. Thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the LORD do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part me from thee.”

 

There was a Jewish law that required a blood relative man to take a Jewish woman relative who was widowed into his household. So Naomi had a place on the farm of her kinsman Boaz.  But with Naomi’s request, and Ruth’s unexpected presence as a respectful, hard-working woman, who was a foreigner—a Moabite woman—she was welcomed into the house of Boaz in the little town of Bethlehem.  Spoiler alert: in the last chapter Boaz and Ruth end up married-a Judean man and a Moabite woman. And from that mixed marriage, Boaz and Ruth had a son. According to Ruth 4:17, and it says it exactly this way in the Bible: “The women of the neighborhood gave him a name, saying, ‘A son has been born to Naomi.’ They named him Obed; he became the father of Jesse, who is the father of David.  And who was born from the house and the lineage of David, in that little town of Bethlehem? (O Little Town of Bethlehem) Yes. The Christ of Christmas. Jesus was born from a mixed marriage lineage. Who better to be show the world what it means to be a good neighbor? Today I ask you what a special minister asked boys and girls every day:

“Won’t you be my neighbor?”

 

Jeffrey A. Sumner                                                          November 4, 2018